As Far As You Can Go

September 22, 2012

Like My Previous Collection, But With 100% Added Story

Are you tired of picking up short story collections and finding only nine or ten tales inside? Do you often wonder why someone hasn’t published a collection of 18 stories?

Well they have. As Far As You Can Go is a new collection by Martin Philp. It  features all the award-winning stories* of his puny collection One Big Echo of a Much Nicer Place, with eight brand-new stories, bulking the total up to a spray-tanned, muscular 18 (yes, 18) stories.

And at just over two quid for the entire collection, it works out at a great-value, recession-proof 11.1p per story.**

What’s it about?

As Far As You Can Go is 18 largely interconnected stories set in West Cornwall. They’re a mixed bag of comic tales with a mildly maudlin streak I can only apologise for. You’ll meet Dandy, a flamboyant, lonely, desperate-to-be-loved, Hayle man who suffers a cruel fate during carnival day. (You can read Dandy Allcock here.) John, who has a dangerous obsession with purchasing cut-price power tools from German supermarkets. And foul-mouthed Jack Tremenyans, who each year decorates the town with Christmas lights and a torrent of expletives. (Bizarrely, Jack’s story Merry Fucking Christmas recently featured in a Christmas service at Truro Cathedral.)

But is it any good?

To be honest, I’m not the best person to ask: I’ve messed about with these stories so much it makes my eyes water just looking at them. But the first collection did win the Holyer An Gof Award Fiction Category in 2010 (it’s a Cornish thing celebrating Cornish arts). And I have had some nice reviews from people.

You’ve convinced me. You’ve worn me down. You can have my flippin’ two quid.

You can buy a Kindle edition of the book on Amazon

And bear in mind, if you don’t have a Kindle reader, you can download one for free and read if from there. If anyone would prefer an iPad version or any other format, let me know and I’ll get on to it. It should only take me two and a half years or so.

Hope you like the book. If you don’t, well, as John Shuttleworth would say, I’m sorry.

Cheers.

*Apart from one, which wasn’t very good.

**Calculation not accurate

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Buy Local – Pick Up An Award-Winning Collection of Cornish Stories For Just £2.10

April 6, 2012

As Far As You Can Go is my new collection of e-book stories set in Cornwall.

About as far away as you can get from pirates, piskies or picture-postcard Cornwall, this collection of largely comic tales is packed with plain-speaking and occasionally foul-mouthed Cornish characters.

The collection includes most of the stories from my previous print collection One Big Echo of a Much Nicer Place, which won the Holyer An Gof Award for Fiction (2010), plus eight new stories.

Reviews:

Martin Philp is a highly original writer of great talent. His odd blend of humour and tragedy must be quite unique.
COLIN WILSON, AUTHOR OF THE OUTSIDER

 [It is…] likely to be the start of a much wider and deserved recognition for a writer of such exhilarating talent.
DES HANNIGAN, WESTERN MORNING NEWS

Philp conjures a world inhabited by convincing characters. Sad, foul-mouthed and always authentic, his stories invariably possess a great sting in the tail.
THE WESTERN MORNING NEWS

Very funny. Read it at your peril and be prepared to laugh a lot.
THE CORNISHMAN

Support local produce – buy my collection of 18 short stories for a minimum wage- and seasonal income-friendly £2.05.

Haven’t got a Kindle? You can get a Kindle reader for your computer or smartphone.

Like to sample the produce before purchase? Then read a story.

That’s the hard sell over. Thanks for listening!

Cheers.

Martin Philp

ps If you could like my Facebook page, it would be a great help in getting the word around.


Meet the Characters (Part 2)

January 28, 2010

Florence Bray
Apparently growing older is best done gracefully, but no one told that to Florence Bray. With her barely tolerated husband recently in his grave, she rages against the wasted years, casts off acquaintances and finds solace, and adventure, at last in the company of the demonic Mr Drew, a man with an appetite for love, drink and offending the elderly.

Henry Caldwell
Meet an ice cream salesman with a mind as cold and icy as his frosty confections. Henry is the scourge of hot, sweaty optimistic youth, and seems bent on bringing the knowledge of life’s disappointments to the young as quickly as is inhumanely possible. What will save the youth of Hayle from Henry? Love, of course, in the shapely shape of fellow ice cream vendor Sarah.

Ronnie Honeychurch
What is art? No idea, and neither has Ronnie by the looks of it. Until one day this anxious little painter of twee Cornish landscapes accidentally smears one of his tired paintings and begins a journey through impressionism, expressionism, and finally a deadly abstraction. Or something like that. Like I say, I know nothing about art. Like everyone else, I just look at the price tag.

Bill Downder
Bill keeps a diary. Every day he writes what he has for dinner, and what the weather’s like. Then his wife dies. And Bill embarks on a furious spree of writing (well, about 1,000 words)  looking back at the years with humour, regret and an admission that he knew exactly what his wife did with Fish Pie Matthews at the dinner and dance.  I’m sorry, I can’t write any more. I’m welling up.

PC George Thomas
He’s fat, he’s indolent, he wouldn’t know a clue if he saw a great big sign saying ‘Clue!’, and therefore, naturally – and really it goes without saying – he’s absolutely nothing like any policeman in Cornwall or adjacent counties. PC George Thomas is, however, quite the connoisseur of quality biscuits. Join him on a courtesy call to the recently robbed Mrs Grace Pellow, and on a high-tea adventure through Hob Nobs, Chocolate Fingers and beyond.


Meet the Characters (Part 1)

January 18, 2010

Here’s a few of the character’s that appear in One Big Echo of a Much Nicer Place. (And, incidentally, are popping up frequently in the next collection of stories I’m writing now.)

Dandy Allcock – Take a gameshow host from the Seventies (preferably one from an unbroadcast pilot) mix in a little auctioneer and finish with a sprinkling of horse-racing commentator and you have Dandy: a man who just wants to be loved and that no one in Hayle can stomach for more than a few minutes.

Barbara Morethek – Morethek means something like sadness in Cornish, I forget exactly what now, and Barbara is the epitome of the person who sees all the world through a veil of sepia-tinted nostalgia. Her life is a crackling Cine film, with a soundtrack made up of sighs and water dripping from guttering on a Sunday afternoon.

Jack Tremenyans – When some people swear it’s ugly, when others do it’s an art form. Jack belongs to the latter group – never does ‘fucking’ sound so vital and alive than when falling, mid mishap, from his cursing Cornish lips.

Archie – Otherwise known as Old Broken Window Bachelor. Living a life of purity can be a pretty dirty business. Ragged old Archie drinks and smokes his way through his autumn years like the young poet of his youth. Wise people salute him; commonplace people sneer.

Tommy Wakfer – The uber Cornish male. Suspicious of change one moment, Quixotic the next, a profanity or a poetic utterance never far from his lips. He’s never had a full story proper to himself yet, just an anecdote, though he pops up in a lot of other character’s stories when the raging spirit of Cornishness need to rear its beautiful/ugly head.